Category Archives: Government

Pet Licence Renewal Notice

All dog and cats over six (6) months old must be licensed through the Town of Gull Lake. This includes all pets that are kept indoors. Dog licenses are due by January 31 of each year or within 30 days of becoming an owner of a dog. The Town Bylaw Officer will be working with residents with unlicensed pets after January 31st to ensure all pets are licensed.

  • First Male/Female $ 25.00
  • If Spayed or Neutered $15.00
  • Additional Dog $30.00
  • Vicious Dog $100.00
  • Replacement License Tag $2.00

“Vicious Dog” means a dog, the owner of which has paid a Bylaw Violation Tag, or been convicted in Provincial Court of biting, injuring, chasing or threatening a person(s).  No person shall harbor more than two (2) dogs or cats.  Dog and cat license can be picked up at the Town Office during office hours.

Governments Invest in Crop Research | News and Media | Government of Saskatchewan

Photo by: Blake Campbell

Photo by: Blake Campbell

Today Federal Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Lawrence MacAulay and Saskatchewan Agriculture Minister Lyle Stewart announced nearly $7.7 million in funding for 46 crop-related research projects through the province’s Agriculture Development Fund (ADF).

“Research in agriculture is the key to maintaining a competitive edge, and that’s why the federal government, in partnership with provinces and agriculture organizations, invests in research,” MacAulay said. “These millions of dollars invested into crops research in Saskatchewan over the years will help create growth and put more money in the pockets of farmers within the sector.”

“Ongoing investments into research and development provide Saskatchewan farmers and ranchers the ability to be competitive in the global marketplace, while producing food sustainably,” Stewart said.  “Continual innovation through the ADF leads to improved crop varieties, more value-added processing and cutting edge farming practices and knowledge, keeping our agriculture industry strong.”

The 46 projects receiving funding this year are diverse and include research on: improving plant breeding technology specifically to test for DON toxins that are the result of fusarium head blight infection in wheat; optimizing loss-sensing technology on farm equipment to minimize losses at harvest; and the development of a pulse-based replacement for shortening that can be used in baked goods, to name a few.

Today’s ADF announcement leverages significant funding from industry partners, on top of government funding.  A total of almost $3.7 million is being committed from partner organizations that include Western Grains Research Foundation, SaskPulse, SaskCanola, SaskFlax, Sask Wheat and Alberta Wheat Commission.

“We are appreciative of the funding provided through ADF that enables collaboration and the ability to make advancements across the Saskatchewan agriculture sector,” Saskatchewan Pulse Growers Executive Director Carl Potts said. “Amongst the funded projects are ones looking to address key priority areas for pulse growers such as weed control and pest management in pulse crops.”

“We welcome governments’ continued commitment to agricultural innovation,” Managing Director of the Crop Development Centre (CDC) at the University of Saskatchewan Kofi Agblor said.  “The CDC has released more than 450 new varieties of crops since its inception, varieties that today account for significant acreage across the prairies, illustrating just how significant an economic contribution research makes to the agricultural economy.  We look forward to continuing this important work.”

ADF funding is part of the $26.8 million the Government of Saskatchewan committed to agriculture research for 2016-17.  Funding for ADF projects is provided under Growing Forward 2, a federal-provincial-territorial initiative.

For more information, and to see a complete list of funded projects, visit www.saskatchewan.ca and search “Agriculture Development Fund.”

Source: Governments Invest in Crop Research | News and Media | Government of Saskatchewan

Government Announces Move to Single Provincial Health Authority | News and Media | Government of Saskatchewan

Change Will Reduce Administration While Improving Co-ordination of Health Services

Today, Health Minister Jim Reiter accepted all of the recommendations of the Saskatchewan Advisory Panel on Health System Structure, and announced the province will consolidate the 12 existing Regional Health Authorities (RHAs) into one single Provincial Health Authority.

“One Provincial Health Authority that is focussed on better co-ordination of health services across the province will improve the quality of care patients receive,” Reiter said.  “It will also reduce administration and duplication across the health system.

“This change represents a consolidation of administration, not a centralization of services.  Our government remains committed to providing high-quality health services in every part of the province.  Our goal is better co-ordination between the health services provided in different areas of the province.”

Along with the recommendation to move to a single Provincial Health Authority, the Advisory Panel recommends the appointment of a single Board of Directors to govern the new Authority.  The report also recommends system-wide improvements that include consolidation of health system administrative support functions and some clinical services such as laboratory and diagnostic imaging, and the planning, dispatch and delivery of Emergency Medical Services (EMS).

“We recognize the changes we are recommending are significant,” Advisory Panel member Dr. Dennis Kendel said.  “The Advisory Panel encourages the provincial government and senior leaders within the health system to take the time required to ensure a smooth transition.”

This is a significant change, and it will take time to create a new Provincial Health Authority.  Work on implementation planning has already begun at the Ministry of Health.  A comprehensive plan is being developed that will work through critical implementation details, including legislation, governance, financial and change management considerations.  While the date the new Provincial Health Authority will come into being is still to be determined, it is anticipated to occur in fall 2017.

“We want to do this quickly, but it is important to do this right,” Reiter said.  “The priority will be planning for a smooth transition and ensuring patients are always the focus.  Throughout the transition to the new Provincial Health Authority, our number one goal will be to ensure patients receive the same or better care.

“I thank the Advisory Panel for its thoughtful report,” Reiter said.  “I am confident that implementing these recommendations will result in the most effective and efficient health care structure for Saskatchewan.”

Optimizing and Integrating Patient-Centred Care: Saskatchewan Advisory Panel on Health System Structure is available online at www.saskatchewan.ca.

Source: Government Announces Move to Single Provincial Health Authority | News and Media | Government of Saskatchewan